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Buyer Beware: Nook HD+ 8.9 dies unexpectedly

Nook HD is no more
Nook HD is no more
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Barnes and Noble's Nook tablets and their unique design choices have been featured on this site before (Sept. 13'). What this reviewer couldn't predict is that less than a year after publishing that article, the device would go to sleep without even saying goodbye.

A quick bit of research shows that a potentially fatal flaw is present in the device. The "MAG2GA TRIM bug" is a corruption in the device's firmware that causes the product to "brick" or fail permanently. There is nothing that a user does to cause this and it seems there isn't any simple way to fix it once it happens.

There are two things to say about this. First, it's downright disappointing. If the Nook line wasn't already discontinued, it would be time to demand a fix. Second, you are probably within your warranty so contact Barnes and Noble's website here and insist on a quick and hassle-free replacement. It's obvious to me that Barnes and Noble is aware of the issue. What turned suspicion into fact was this entry in Barnes and Noble's knowledge base titled "Unresponsive NOOK® Device" It was the number one solution under troubleshooting Nook devices. The problem here, is that you will only find this article after deeply engaging with the Nook support process. A general search and a scan of the support section will show you absolutely nothing. The article details an inane and complicated process that feels like one step above a guess. It claims to be a first step towards repairing the following issues:

"An unresponsive NOOK may exhibit the following symptoms:

· Image stuck on the screen
· Unable power off
· Unresponsive to button or touch screen commands
· Unresponsive after fully charging"

The procedure to attempt a fix includes pressing and holding the power button for 20 seconds, then releasing the power button and pressing the power button again for 2 seconds. This is obviously a problem that Barnes and Noble is aware of. That said, it seems that Barnes and Noble didn't need to inform Nook owners of the issue. There was no pro active attempt to educate or repair and obviously no quick software patch to avoid this in the first place. Barnes and Noble is reacting to a problem that makes their product an expensive paperweight by looking the other way.

Buyer beware.