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Burning After Intercourse: Why Does Vagina Hurt After Sex?

Why Does Vagina Hurt After Sex
Why Does Vagina Hurt After Sex
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Occasional burning or slight irritation in the vaginal area can be normal after sexual intercourse, especially if it is been awhile since your last sexual encounter. Constant pain in the vaginal area after intercourse is not normal, and can be a sign of a more serious health condition. While there are different factors that can burning, a health care professional should be consulted.

There are some questions that women commonly asked, regarding some of the causes for the burning sensations in their vaginas. Knowing the answers to some of the questions can help them determine their best treatment options and better inform their health care provider.

Even the occasional burning or pain in a woman's vaginal area can cause her to become concerned, and here are the answers to a few questions that can help her determine if it is a sign of something more serious.

1. Why does my vagina burn after sexual intercourse?
One of the main causes for irritation in the vagina after intercourse is caused by lack of lubrication. This is more common in older women whose hormonal levels are often changing due to menopause. This problem is easy to take care of by simply using a vaginal lubricant during sex. It is estimated that more than two thirds of sexually active women will experience some irritation after intercourse due to vaginal dryness at least once in their lives.

2. Why does it hurt every time after having sex?
If a woman is experiencing pain in her vaginal area every time she has intercourse, a health care professional should be consulted. Pain and discomfort in this area can be caused by a number of different factors including polyps, cysts, yeast infections, endometriosis, vulvar vestibultis, vulvodynia and vaginismus. Sexually transmitted diseases can also cause pain during and after intercourse.

3. What is vaginismus?
This condition can affect women at any age, though it is often detected in younger women. The condition is caused by the sudden contracting of the vaginal muscles, and can also make it difficult to have sexual intercourse. The muscle contractions can be mild or more severe, and can also be either constant or reoccurring.

4. What is vulvar vestibultis?
Often caused by vaginal infections, this condition can cause intense pain or burning in the vagina after intercourse. It can be misdiagnosed as another health problem, and is thought to effect over 16 percent of sexually active women. Treatment often involves eating healthier, regular exercise, and even kegel exercises.

5. What is vulvodynia?
Pain at the opening to the vaginal canal and burning sensations after intercourse is often caused by vulvodynia. Once the exact cause of the burning has been determined a health care provider can recommend a treatment plan.

6. What are some other causes for vaginal burning after sex?
Some of the other causes can include a yeast infection or even some sexually transmitted diseases. Another common reason women experience burning in their vaginas after sex is an allergic reaction to the spermicide used on condoms and some other birth control devices. While a yeast infection and any STD will need to be treated by a health care professional, vaginal burning due to an allergic reaction can be treated by simply switching to a different type of condom.

Relieving Vaginal Burning
There are some methods women can try at home to help relieve painful burning and irritation in the vaginal area. Rinsing off with warm water after sex can help to remove any irritants and soothe chaffed skin. This can also help to keep the delicate PH level in the vagina balanced to help prevent any bacterial infections from developing. Applying baking soda directly to the inner vaginal walls can also help to relieve some burning sensations.

Conclusion
While it is not uncommon for women to occasionally experience some vaginal burning after intercourse, it should never be felt every time. For infrequent irritation, most women can find relief by simply using a lubricant during intercourse. Changing the type of protection that is used can also help to prevent any vaginal burning from occurring due to an allergic reaction, and it can also keep you from contracting any sexually transmitted diseases. Most women who experience vaginal burning after sex do not have to worry about another, more serious condition, but it is always a good idea to speak with a health care provider anytime pain, burning, or discomfort is felt in the vaginal area.