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Buddy Holly every where, all the time

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Lubbock, Texas may not be at the top of your bucket list for places to visit, but maybe it should be.
Lubbock is Buddy Holly all the time in every place. Although this mid-sized city has produced more than its fair share of celebrities, the ill-fated rocker stands out as the most cherished for the local citizenry.
Holly’s life tragically was cut short in a plane crash in Clear Lake, IA on Feb. 3, 1959 along with up and coming singer Riche Valens and Jiles Perry Richardson AKA “The Big Bopper.”
The Buddy Holly Museum is easily spotted by the huge, black horn-rimmed glasses at the entrance. These were Holly’s trademark and the pair he was wearing when he was killed is on display inside. The museum is a paean to the musician with a collection of guitars, clothes, costumes, and memorabilia. www.buddyhollycenter.org.
Adjacent to nearby Lubbock Airport is the Silent Wings Museum, dedicated to the brave World War II soldiers who flew box-shaped gliders and the men who rode them into battle.
These gliders look nothing like the sleek aircraft of today and many visitors wonder at how they didn’t simply drop to earth like rocks. Many of the men jammed inside must have had the same thoughts.
There is an extensive collection of vintage aircraft inside the bright and airy building and military artifacts from both the Axis powers and the Allies, making a very interesting trip back in history. www.silentwingsmuseum.com.
The American Wind Power Center displays historic windmills, an important factor in keeping early Texas-and America-in fresh water, ground grain for bread and many other activities that needed a steady and cheap source of power. There is even an opportunity to go inside one of the giant turbines to see how it functions. www.windmill.com.
Texas is cattle country and no visit here would be complete without a stop at the National Ranching Heritage Center. Set up to look like a small community covering some 16-acres, the Center has 48 original structures brought in from a variety of ranches.
There are bunk houses, manor houses, stables, barns, and a rare dugout home built into a hillside. The structures date back as far as the 1700s and range all the way to the 1950s. The paths through the Center offer an easy stroll through history and give even the casual visitor a feeling for what life was back in the days of Texas as part of the Wild West. www.NRHC.ttu.edu.
Most people are unaware that Texas is the fifth largest wine producing state in the country with five top wineries in Lubbock. Two of the more outstanding are Llano (pronounced Yahno) Estacado and McPherson Cellars.
Llano Estacado www.llanowine.com, has a tasting room for guests to sample the product and then tour the facilities The only caveat if you are flying is the TSA will confiscate any bottle of wine you try to carry on board because the liquid exceeds allowable limits and that grand bottle of wine will be destined for the dinner table of some TSA agent instead of yours.
Most wineries will give you a box to ship your bounty home safely and some will offer to ship it for you…at your cost.
Not too far away in a converted Coca Cola bottling plant is McPherson Cellars across the street from La Diosa Cellars. Kim McPherson owns the winery and his wife, Sylvia, is the Doña at La Diosa.
Kim will sit and talk wine making from A-Z with visitors, discussing his product and the care that goes into producing it. At present he does not produce enough to widen his market and he will only do so slowly. http://www.mcphersoncellars.com/
La Diosa, only a few yards from the winery, is a pleasant bistro where visitors can relax with a meal, tapas and a glass of-what else?-McPherson Wine. www.LaDiosacellars.com.
A must stop for lovers of Barbecue is Eddie’s Bar-B-Q., not only a restaurant but a destination in itself. Decorated with the most eclectic (make that “really weird stuff”) from street signs to ranching gear, the downscale eatery produces arguably amongst the best beef brisket barbecue in the Lone Star State.
The portions are huge, heaped on the plate and prices are more than reasonable, ranging from $4.75 for Eddie’s Frito Pie (fritos, beans, sausage, chopped beef, cheese and sour cream) to a full rack of ribs at $18.50.
Eddie’s is a blue collar destination that also draws people in business suits but precious few tourists. Regulars hope the word never gets out. Selfish people! BBQEddies@yahoo.com.
Texas may no longer be the biggest state in the country, but its heart and people can still lay claim to an attitude of “Y’all come.”

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