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Black Blood Brothers episode 8: Protector

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With Ergo Proxy complete, we shift our focus back to Black Blood Brothers. It's true, it's been a while since I watched the last episode, I usually only had a vague idea of what the characters were talking about anyway.

Truth be told, this episode is fairly straight forward. It doesn't have the gripping tension that Ergo Proxy had, but I wasn't completely befuddled either, which is a plus.

The kid in the raincoat finally gets some attention as we learn his name, Yafuri, and learn that he is a Kowloon child. He can also hold his own as he seems to get the upper hand when he confronts Jiro. Yafuri suspects that Jiro is holding back, and later dialogue suggests that he would have lost, but we see no proof of that here.

The question is raised about how a Kowloon got in and the shadowy cabal comes to the conclusion that there is an insider working against them. I actually rather liked this scene. It was one of the more engaging parts of the episode and it managed to put forth some important plot points to boot.

Unlike previous episodes, this one, by and large, is tonally consistent. There is one scene with Mimiko and Hibari in a hotel room that takes a radical tone shift into the comedic, but it was just one scene. I wouldn't even mind the levity, but this show still can't get the two to mix properly. Instead we have scenes that shoot back and forth and as a result, the comedy feels out of place.

We do get some headway as far as an ongoing story arc is concerned near the end of the episode when Jiro confronts Cain. It seems the Kowloons have some bigger scheme in mind, a scheme that has been in motion for some time. As a result, Jiro and Kotaro being killed doesn't seem to be the focus.

At first, when Cain said that Jiro wasn't a target, I figured it was going to be due to the "challenge" that Yufari talked about before, but that didn't seem to be the case. It could be a little of both, but the two motivations do seem to be mutually exclusive.

As has frequently been the case, the score for this show is quite solid. It helps build tension during the character conversations and gives the show a bit more umph than it otherwise would have.

I still feel like the plot needs to start moving. We're down to a handful of episodes and it seems like things haven't advanced a whole lot. We'll see how things progress from here, though. It could still kick things up a notch or two and end things on a glorious note, you never know.