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Beware of accidents during power blackouts

Home power blackouts will require an emphasis upon safety.
Home power blackouts will require an emphasis upon safety.Photo by Donald Weber/Getty Images

Even though there is not a great problem during the spring and fall seasons with keeping cool without electricity to run air conditioning units, or not a great problem with keeping warm without electricity to run forced air heating systems, other dangers still exist. This is especially true for very young and old family members.

Without good lighting, many home accidents are more likely to occur. Even those preppers who have battery powered lanterns and headlamps, will not have lighting that will be as good as when their electricity is flowing and their regular level of lighting is operational.

Even during normal conditions, falls account for more than one third of all fatal accidents in the home. Power blackouts will usher in a number of conditions that can make such falls even more likely. Less lighting in the home, for example, will make visual cues harder to see. Also, sleep deprivation and anxiety will make family members more likely to be clumsy. For example, a sleep deprived, anxious child might fall down a poorly illuminated staircase.

Falls are just one category of accidents that could increase during conditions of poor lighting. As another example, a grandfather might make a mistake with the medications that he takes. As a third example, a grandmother preparing a meal in a poorly illuminated kitchen might be more likely to cut herself when slicing food. As a final example, any family member with a heart condition could suffer a heart attack from the anxiety brought about by the power blackout.

There also are dangers outside of the home during power blackouts. With no electricity, the roads will have no stoplights and not even streetlights at night. These conditions will make car accidents more likely. Other drivers will be stressed out and more prone to have car accidents and road rage, especially after car accidents.

Older family members who still drive will do so at great risk during a power blackout. They cannot drive as well after dark, and thus, they will be even more at risk when the streetlights are not working. Also, they might not adapt as well as younger drivers to the “four way stop” rule at intersections with non operational stop lights.

Although all family members must be more careful during power blackouts, preppers would do well to look after their very young and old family members even more carefully than during times with a flow of electricity.