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Bette Midler slated to perform at the 2014 Oscars

Two-time Oscar®-nominated actress and multiple Grammy Award®-winning singer Bette Midler will perform for the first time on the Oscars, show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today. The Oscars will air on Sunday, March 2, live on ABC.
Two-time Oscar®-nominated actress and multiple Grammy Award®-winning singer Bette Midler will perform for the first time on the Oscars, show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today. The Oscars will air on Sunday, March 2, live on ABC.Photograph courtesy of AMPAS®

It was released yesterday, Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014, by show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron (in a press release) that singer/actress Bette Midler will be singing at this year's Oscars.

“We are thrilled to have Bette perform on the Oscars for the very first time,” said Zadan and Meron. “We believe she will make our Oscar telecast an especially moving evening.”

In this statement from Zadan and Meron, it's possible that Midler may be singing during the memoriam section of this awards show.

This will be the first time for Bette Midler to perform on the Oscar stage. Midler has been nominated for an Oscar twice. Her first Oscar nomination came in 1980 for her emotional performance in "The Rose" and her second nomination came in 1992 for her work in "For the Boys." Midler is also a multi-Grammy winner, winning a total of three Grammys, along with four Golden Globe Awards and a special Tony Award.

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Whatever your movie choice this week, please remember your movie theater etiquette: silence your cell phones and no texting, please don't talk during the film and remove your children if they become a distraction to other audience members. Don't forget that laughing, crying and cheering are always approved behavior and even encouraged.

-Kay Shackleton is a film historian with special focus on Silent Films, see her work at SilentHollywood.com