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Bestiality ban proposed in New Jersey: Sex with animals still legal in 14 states

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There are two kinds of animal lovers in this world and one of them is about to get banned in New Jersey. One kind of animal lover protects creatures big and small, but another kind is the type that is about to be banned. A new bill proposes making bestiality against the law in New Jersey, which may come as a bit of a surprise to many that having sex with animals is not against the law right now in the state.

According to NJ.com on June 12, New Jersey is one of 14 states that doesn't have a law against having sex with animals. While there are animal cruelty laws on the books for all states, there are a few recent cases that needed the bestiality ban in place to prosecute a crime to the fullest extent.

One case in New Jersey back in 2009 was about a man molesting cows. Prosecutors had to drop the case because animal cruelty didn't fit, but a ban against bestiality would have let them prosecute the man. There was one high-profile case recently "where prosecutors couldn't leverage our animal cruelty laws well enough to prosecute the case as they would have liked to," said New Jersey Assemblyman Jack Ciattarelli. If the bestiality ban had been in place the perpetrator's crime would have been prosecuted differently.

The proposed bill doesn't say it bans bestiality, but it does say "sexual contact" with animals is banned. The bill excludes any medical procedure performed by a vet or an accepted husbandry practice. According to the website AL.com, bestiality is legal in: Texas, Hawaii, Kentucky, Virginia, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Vermont, West Virginia, Montana, Wyoming and the District of Columbia.

Under the proposed bill to ban bestiality in New Jersey, the crime would be considered a fourth degree crime and you can get up to 18 months in prison for having sexual relations with an animal. If an animal dies during an act of bestiality, then the crime moves up to a third degree crime. This bill will need to pass both Assembly and Senate and then it would need to be signed by Governor Christie.

As AL.com suggests, as long as they don't name the bill after someone then it has a better chance of passing. No one wants their name attached to a bestiality law, quips the website!

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