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Best and Worst States for Unemployment

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Earlier this week the United States Department of Labor, released a report on Unemployment in the States for June 2014. Nationally during the month of June unemployment across the United States came in at an average of 6.1%. There were 25 states which were not much different than the national unemployment average.

However there were 8 states that had a measurably higher unemployment rate when compared to the national average. For the last several years Rhode Island and Nevada have historically had among the highest unemployment. Nevada had the highest unemployment in November 2010 at 13.9% while Rhode Island peaked at 11.9% unemployment February 2010. In June 2014 the states with the highest unemployment are:
Mississippi 7.9%
Rhode Island 7.9%
Nevada 7.7%
Michigan 7.5%
California 7.4%
District of Columbia 7.4%
Georgia 7.4%
Kentucky 7.4%
Illinois 7.4%

While the national unemployment rate has been dropping at a snails pace over the last several years things can seem promising on the surface. However, for states with high unemployment some of the lower rate is attributed to people dropping out of labor force and no longer being counted as unemployment. These drop outs believe there is no job available for them and they have given up on searching for a job. Thus artificially lowering the count of those who are unemployed. November 2006 labor force participation was at 66.3% compared to June 2014 labor force participation is 62.8%.

On a brighter note even during the great recession North Dakota stood out as an outlier with consistently low unemployment thanks to the growth high paying jobs in the fossil fuel industry. During June North Dakota posts 2.7% unemployment which translates into jobs that cannot be filled. States with the lowest unemployment rate include:
North Dakota 2.7%
Vermont 3.4%
Utah 3.5%
Nebraska 3.5%
South Dakota 3.8%
Wyoming 4.0%
New Hampshire 4.4%
Iowa 4.4%
Hawaii 4.4%

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