Skip to main content

See also:

Bernie Sanders could seriously be running for president in 2016

Not everyone on the political left is excited about a possible Hillary Clinton run for president in 2016, and they could get their alternative if enough people were able to make it happen.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (ID-VT) speaks during a Conference on the FY2014 Budget Resolution
Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Many liberals and progressives often accuse former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton of being too corporate, taking money from outside interests that have essentially bought her off for more than two decades. Enter the alternative. Independent from Vermont, Sen. Bernie Sanders. A self described "democratic socialist" with a progressive mindset that sets himself apart from the more centrist Clinton. Sanders has hinted at a possible run for the White House before and added more fuel to the fire during an interview Thursday with "Politicking with Larry King" on Ora.tv.

Bernie Sanders: I am giving some thought to it. I haven't made a decision. If I do it, the reason I am hesitating, i'm going around the country because I wanna see what people really think. For me to do well, to win a presidential election, would mean that we would have to put together an unprecedented grassroots movement. You would need many many, hundreds of thousands of people, knocking on doors, educating, organizing. And that isn't an easy thing to do.

Larry King: Ross Perot almost did it.

Sanders: Well the difference between Ross and me, and I like Ross, is that Ross has a few billion dollars in his bank account and I don't.

Sanders has represented Vermont in the Senate since 2007, and previously represented Vermont's at-large district in the House of Representative. Prior to his work in Congress, Sanders was the mayor of Burlington, the largest city in Vermont. Sanders caucuses with the Democratic Party, but hasn't been shy about criticizing the party when he sees fit. Sanders is considered anti-war, which conflicts with the more "hawkish" record of Hillary Clinton. While Sanders defeating Clinton in the primary is seen as unlikely, if he could generate enough juice it could be a step in the right direction for not just the Democratic party, but the country as a whole.