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Backbone, beds and bream fishing

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Simplicity and performance win out with the new Whitey Outlaw Double Duty pole from B’n’M. It is back to basics, but with big panfish in mind.

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“We designed this pole to fish for big bream and big shell crackers,” says pro angler Whitey Outlaw. “I mean those 1-pound bream and those shell crackers that go anywhere from 1 ½- to 3-pounds.”

Outlaw’s motivation to develop a different bream pole was based on his experience. “I wanted to change my bream fishing a little,” said Outlaw. “I previously used B’n’M 12-foot BreamBuster poles. Those are great for normal fishing, but when I targeted those big fish in Santee they would tear the bed up because I was not getting them out quick enough. They would swim around fighting to go back down and basically causing havoc, scaring the other fish.”

Outlaw was looking for more backbone in a lightweight pole with the expectation of landing a few more fish from any given hole. “You need too snatch those fish out of the water as fast as you can and leave nothing but a little ring in the water. The Double Duty is designed with enough backbone to do just that. I describe it as a souped-up model of previous poles.”

Outlaw recalls using plain old cane poles in his youth and just like with a cane pole there is no reel needed with the Double Duty. “On a cane pole you would tie the line on the end of the pole and put a piece of tape on it. We have improved on that. With the Double Duty you just tie your line to the built-in tie-down guide and spiral wrap the line towards the tip. This method adds more backbone to the tip for landing big fish fast.”

He explains that proper rigging adds another benefit. “After I spiral wrap from the tie-down to the tip, I tie two wing knots and run it back through the eye. The reason I do that is to keep from snatching an eye off the end. If you put all the weight on the eye and you are hanging up on brush and stumps you might snatch that eye off if you tie direct.”

The remainder of the rigging is just like any bream fishing. Make the line as long as the pole, add a cork, a #4 hook from TTI Blakemore and flip it out as you paddle along looking for likely holes. “Bream fishing can get pretty technical if you want it to get technical, but we do it the old fashion way,” says Outlaw.”

The old fashion way means getting a bunch of crickets, setting in the front of his jon boat, feet dangling in the water and paddling along slowly looking for bream beds.

Outlaw repeated his admonition about getting the fish out quickly. “You catch one and the others scatter. That is why I developed the Double Duty. You need to lift that fish up and out quickly to keep from spooking the other fish. You gotta’ get em’ out of the water as quickly as you can, that way you have a chance for bigger numbers.”

As it turns out, this rod makes a great jig pole too. In fact, that is where the name came from. Outlaw credits his wife Brandi for coming up with the name. “It was Brandi that came up with the Double Duty name. She recognized that the pole was also good for jigging. If you are fishing bulrush or lily pads in water that is 5 feet deep just put on about 3- to 4-feet of line and get with it.”

The Double Duty was introduced by B’n’M Poles at the 2014 ICAST show in Orlando. It is a two-piece solid graphite rod blank. It is rated as medium-action for landing those big heavy hybrid bream and any size crappie. The pole comes in 11- and 12-foot lengths. It is perfectly balanced with a comfortable foam handle for all day fishing.

The Double Duty is so light you can fish it all day long and you don’t need a reel, which would add extra weight. “Because it can do its duty on both bream and crappie we called it the Double Duty. The market is long overdue for coming up with a good pole with a good backbone like this.”

For more information on the Whitey Outlaw Double Duty and all B’n’M products visit the website at https://www.bnmpoles.com.

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