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Back to school may bring anxiety to children

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Back to school. Parents sigh, children groan, teacher prepare. For parents the sound of the school bells are a welcomed sound; teacher for the most part are ready to begin the year and look forward to the coming classes. Children, however, have mixed feelings.

If a child is popular they are elated at the thought of a new class! If studious the coming classes are met with anticipation for an opportunity to increase learning to expand ones the mind.

On the other hand if a child has been bullied, shy, abused at home or have tremendous apprehension of leaving home; school is not seen as an enjoyable event but rather stressful; leaving them with much anxiety.

Parents, Caregivers, Teachers and Principals should be aware of the students who do not fair well at school. Compassion and willing to extend oneself to reach out to these precious lives will pay off in the future for the child. The adult will carry on into the coming years knowing they did their part to enhance the life of a child.

Signs & Symptoms

Although all kids experience anxiety in certain situations, most (even those who live through traumatic events) don't develop anxiety disorders. Those who do, however, will seem anxious and have one or more of the following signs:

* excessive worry most days of the week, for weeks on end
* trouble sleeping at night or sleepiness during the day
* restlessness or fatigue during waking hours
* trouble concentrating
* irritability

These problems can affect a child's day-to-day functioning, especially when it comes to concentrating in school, sleeping, and eating.

And it's common for kids to avoid talking about how they feel, because they're worried that others (especially their parents) might not understand. They may fear being judged or considered weak, scared, or "babyish." And although girls are more likely to express their anxiety, boys experience these feelings, too, and sometimes find it hard to talk about. This leads many kids to feel alone or misunderstood.

The good news is that doctors and therapists today understand anxiety disorders better than ever before and, with treatment, can help kids feel better. Resourse: Kids Health.org

Reach out in your neighborhoods and community. Watch for opportunity to volunteer to assist these parents and teacher with the children who are in need.

Getting involved in the life of a child bring great rewards! Loving these little ones will be the most important thing you do for them and yourself.

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