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Autism Touching Milwaukee

Autism Ribbon
Autism Ribbon
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One of my jobs is working as a line therapist for three Autistic children in Southeastern Wisconsin. Those of you on pulse with the spectrum will probably recognize the programs for these amazing youngsters called CHildhood Autism Treatment Team (CHATT) and Integrated Developmental Services (IDS). I am truly blessed to work with these three kiddos, and feel like they are teaching me more than I could ever teach them.
Since beginning to work with these children I find myself more in-tuned to people's reactions to children with Autism. Especially out in public my eyes have become opened up to the lack of respect that these amazing children are being shown. I have seen adults push their own kids away from an Autistic child in the middle of a meltdown, and have a little laugh at their expense. Now, I find this behavior insulting! These gifted children live in a world that is separate from the one you and I know, their brains work differently from ours. They have unique ways of expressing themselves, and these ways should be praised, not swept under the rug. They deserve respect from adults, who need to teach their children that "different" is not "scary." These children need, and expect love just like everyone else.
These kiddo's parents (God bless them) are amazing people whose strength and courage deserve to be rewarded, not looked down upon. I often find that society looks to the parents and blames them for their child's differently-abled status. This is mind-boggling to me. These parents are living their life, raising their kids, and they have become warriors. They fight for their children the way every parent does, but they have added pressures. These children are not able to have the same freedom, and experiences that other children do their age. This is a huge stress for the parents who are simply trying to give their kids the right to discover life.
So please, the next time you're walking through Grand Avenue Mall, or going to church on Sunday, or watching a movie at the Ridge, or having a pizza at Pizza Hut don't be so quick to judge that little boy or girl in the spectrum. They are working with their parents, teachers, line therapists, ect to integrate themselves into every day society so that one day they will be able to blend into the crowd, and calm their body down to our speed. If you are not directly affected by Autism count your blessings, and say a prayer for those that are.

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