Skip to main content

See also:

Autism Awareness in Greater Binghamton NY

The Greater Binghamton area is at it again!

With the release of the new CDC showing a 40% increase in the rates this year to now 1 in every 68 children having a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder, folks were educated and made aware of autism.

The emphasis this year by Advocates For Autism was not to just talk about children cannot do, but let's highlight what they can do. And what they can do is ART. So for the second year in a row we had ARTism, a gallery at the Broome County Library created by Mirella Fernandez, librarian, on the high-end art work that is produced and sometimes it is only produced because of the nature of the autism disorder itself. Not in a "savant" way...goodness that word went out with the "R-word" but to showcase pieces that can sell for a lot of money. Each year we hope the gallery will become bigger.

The next event that is gaining in popularity is the Celebrity Pasta Dinner put on by the teachers working directly with students with autism. Sauce and Pasta was donated by Cortese and organized by the Oaktree PTO for The Oaktree Students with Autism Program, at the area center - over 750 people bought pasta dinners served by celebrities such as Donna Lupardo, Brandi Bailey, John Matzo, Mario Brothers, Taylor Swift (impersonator) and a few Disney prnicesses! The money will go towards a carnival held at the school for the students in May.

TLC's Pizza on Front Street will once again hold a Family Fun Festival, organized by the Binghamton University student chapter of Autism Speaks and the generosity of Tim business owner and parent. Bands, food, fun! A great turnout and the money is donated to Autism Speaks for Research.

The Autism 5k run/Walk is being held at Ostiningo Park on 4/12. Registration begins at 11:30 and the Southern Tier Runners Club will mark the course for those interested; while there will be a 5k walk for families and children.They hope to raise enough funds to purchase iPads, a technology that is now widely used as 'assistive devices' to enable the student with autism to communicate with those around him in the classroom and other places.