Skip to main content

See also:

'Assassin's Creed Unity' release pushed back to November

Assassin's Creed Unity
Assassin's Creed Unity
Photo courtesy Ubisoft

On Thursday morning, Ubisoft announced that it is delaying the release of Assassin’s Creed Unity until November 11. The announcement came on the company blog and Ubisoft admitted it knew that was two weeks later than the original launch date.

Assassin’s Creed Unity, which is set during the French Revolution has been billed as one of the biggest and most immersive Assassin’s Creed games to date. Senior Producer Vincent Pontbriand talked about the size and scope of the title in its official announcement saying, “This being a fully next-gen game, it requires a lot of work, a lot of production, and a lot of learning.”

Pontbriand also said that it’s always hard to be precise about when a product is finished and how much work is involved. He said the firm realized as it got closer to deadline that they weren’t quite there yet. A major part of the reason for the delay, according to the development team is they have rebuilt most of the sytems driving Assassin’s Creed Unity.

It appears as if moving to the next generation has been the real issue with Ubisoft hitting its own self-imposed deadline. The company mentioned there are more than 3,000 PNCs in the game and the depth of the AI is more complex than they first imagined.

Minor adjustments in this Assassin’s Creed is the official reason for the extra two weeks apparently. What those adjustments will turn out to be will likely never be known, even long after Unity is finally released. From the business side, it might make sense to push Assassin’s Creed Unity back 14 days just so it has less release day competition. October 28 already had Lords of the Fallen and WWE 2K15 hitting store shelves alongside Unity.

The November 11 release date means Assassin’s Creed will only have one AAA competitor in The Crew. Interestingly enough, the moving back of Unity also means it will now be in line with Assassin’s Creed Rogue. Rogue is the version of the series only available for the Xbox 360 and PS3 when it comes to consoles.

Was releasing Unity alongside Rogue something the company decided was in its best interests? We’ll likely never know the answer to that particular question unless someone from the development team lets it slip accidentally. We do know the team is excited about the future of its next generation title with Pontbriand saying the wait for Assassin’s Creed Unity will be worth it.