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Are You Heading to the Cloud?

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There is so much talk about “going to the cloud” and “working in the cloud” these days that people probably feel like they are literally in a cloud. With so many references of the cloud being made over the last several months and few years, many are surely wondering what the fuss is all about.

One big cloud discussion is that of productivity apps, the most popular Google Apps vs. Microsoft Office 365. Without going into a lot of dialogue, the bottom line is that they both let users create documents with the greatest of ease, but what are the benefits of each one?

When you get right down to the nuts and bolts of it, they both include your basic type of functions and uses: productivity tools (word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, etc), email, calendar, messaging, etc., which work pretty well and are standard.

In my opinion, what you choose is based on your needs. Google Apps would be ideal and best suited for smaller businesses and enterprises, and would be easier to deploy to its users. It’s also probably easier to use right off the ground.

Another thing, if you are a small operation, and receive documents from users of Microsoft office (which is still the norm and includes the majority of users), documents may not convert very cleanly, so keep that in mind as a consideration.

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