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Are You a Crunchy Mom?

If you're this close to your child for most of every day....
If you're this close to your child for most of every day....Emily L. Goodman

Homeschooling parents, it seems, are automatically classified as “crunchy.” If you’re at home with your kids all day every day, you must be “crunchy.” Often, outsiders don’t realize that homeschooling parents come in all different shapes and sizes—but as a homeschooling parent, you may, as a matter of necessity, have picked up a few other crunchy habits. For example….

Do you cloth diaper your younger children? This is equally weighty whether you decided to do this for environmental or financial reasons, though obviously environmental reasons have a heavier weight on this particular scale. Bonus points if you’ve actively tried to convert someone else to cloth diapering.

Do you fix most of your meals from scratch? Some homeschooling families are just as likely to grab a meal on the go as their public-schooled peers; but others prefer to cook their own, whole foods. If you do this for allergy reasons or behavioral modification reasons…guess what? You’re still crunchy! Bonus points if you regularly bake your own bread and if your children don’t know what pre-packaged desserts taste like.

Do you grow any of your own food? Herbs count. So do fruit trees or vines, which tend to be lower maintenance, particularly if they were planted deliberately.

Do you use cloth products at home instead of disposable products? Outsiders simply won’t believe that you only made the switch because your children were using five rolls of paper towels a week…each.

Do you sew, crochet, or build your own…anything? Extra points if you make your own clothes; even more if you sell them to other people.

Do you regularly wear your baby or toddler? Never mind that you have several children at home of varying ages, and it’s difficult to get anything done if you don’t—if you baby wear, you’re automatically presumed to be crunchy.

There are plenty of things that moms can do that make them slightly “crunchier” than the norm—and there’s nothing wrong with any of them. On the other hand, many “crunchy” measures are also implemented in homeschooling families in order to save money or to serve as a lesson for the kids. After all, every young lady should know how to prepare at least one meal from scratch, right?