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Ancient Egypt and the pharaohs' ruthless practices still amaze us

We normally take our trips in our every day world of the present, but this time we are going to travel to ancient Egypt and visit the pharaohs. The Egyptians and their Pharaohs have given modern-day civilization things to ponder on, with the pyramids being the central point of conversation. There are still so many unanswered questions about how they accomplished their magnificent building projects and how they were able to be so precise in their calculations. However, that is not all that they make us scratch our heads about.

Painting inside a pyramid
Mick Rogers - Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

Although the pharaohs reigned for thousands of years, they ultimately lost their powers to rule. Listed below are some of the things they did that might have been a huge factor in their loss of power.

Pharaoh Pepi II coated slaves with honey to keep flies away from him. Not only was the honey sticky and the flies very annoying, the bees and wasps were also drawn to the sweet nectar.

The first recorded death penalty was in Egypt. The death penalty was the result of the accused being charged with the use of magic. So, it seems that the first witch trial did not occur in Salem, Mass., but actually happened in Egypt thousand's of years earlier.

The Egyptians had a sport where contenders knocked other contenders out of boats in crocodile infested waters. If they were immediately killed by a crocodile, they usually drowned.

Women used crocodile dung as a contraceptive. One thing is for sure; it kept any man, who didn't have a smelling problem away.

The first known use of organized labor was created by the pharaohs. It was very apparent in the building of the pyramids. This process of organized labor was more of a slave type labor than a 40-hour week, with overtime pay.

In addition to these abuses of other humans, there were other things that were created during that time that we still use today. Some of them include the 365-day calendar containing the leap year, the first black ink, oxen drawn plows, paper, and sails, to name a few. So, the pharaohs' rule was not only cruel, but was possibility critical to the development of new ideas and inventions.

Please watch the video in this article for more interesting facts. In addition, if you don't already subscribe to the Memphis International Travel articles and events, written by Gerry Glenn Jones in the Examiner, you can do so by clicking on the subscribe link located beside this writer's photo at the top of the page. All these articles are free.

Until we meet again on these pages, "We will let the world turn onto our next destination."