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'Ancestral Table' cookbook dishes up Paleo diet versions of traditional treats

Try a recipe from this new Paleo diet cookbook.
Try a recipe from this new Paleo diet cookbook.
Victory Belt Publishing

When it comes to following a Paleo food plan, many dieters complain that they feel deprived. Now there's a new solution in a cookbook that provides a tasty convergence of traditional treasures with Paleo guidelines: "The Ancestral Table: Traditional Recipes for a Paleo Lifestyle" (click for details).

Author Russ Crandall has concocted recipes for everything from comfort foods (Southern Fried Chicken) to international (Pesce al Sale). Included are fascinating insights on the history of each dish.

For those familiar with the no-dairy, no-potatoes facet of a Paleo diet, it's worth noting that Russ uses the "Perfect Health Diet" model of Paleo.

Authored by Paul Jaminet Ph.D, "Perfect Health Diet: Regain Health and Lose Weight by Eating the Way You Were Meant to Eat" (click for details) offers a twist on the traditional Paleo plan by permitting moderate use of certain starches and dairy. Paul also wrote the preface to "The Ancestral Table."

Sample the cookbook with the intriguing recipe below. And get more information on "The Ancestral Table: Traditional Recipes for a Paleo Lifestyle" now by clicking here.

SUKUMA WIKI
Serves: 4
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 20 minutes

1 TBSP. OLIVE OIL
1/2 WHITE ONION, COARSELY CHOPPED
2 CLOVES GARLIC, CHOPPED
1 JALAPEÑO PEPPER, SEEDED AND CHOPPED
1 LB. GROUND BEEF OR LAMB
1/2 TSP. BLACK PEPPER
1/2 TSP. GROUND CINNAMON
1/2 TSP. GROUND GINGER
1/2 TSP. GROUND FENNEL SEEDS
1/2 TSP. TURMERIC
1 TSP. SEA SALT
1 TSP. GROUND CUMIN
1 TSP. GROUND CORIANDER
1 BUNCH COLLARD GREENS (ABOUT
8 LEAVES), STEMS REMOVED, SLICED INTO 1" STRIPS
1 LARGE HANDFUL (12-15) CHERRY OR GRAPE TOMATOES, QUARTERED
1 TSP. LEMON JUICE

Collard greens are very versatile and have been in use for at least 2,000 years; the ancient Greeks cultivated them along with kale. Sukuma wiki is the Swahili name for collard greens; it literally translates to “push/stretch the week.” As the name implies, collards are available year-round in East Africa and are used to stretch out meals to last all week.

In the culinary world, sukuma wiki is a common name for a Kenyan dish of braised collard greens, usually prepared with ground meat, tomatoes, and onions. I love this dish because it’s a breeze to put together and an easy way to put something that tastes slightly exotic on the table on short notice. Make sure to prep your ingredients ahead of time, as this dish comes together quickly.

1. Warm the olive oil in a skillet on medium heat, then add the onion. Sauté the onion until softened, about 4 minutes. Add the chopped garlic and jalapeño and sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the ground beef and seasonings and cook until only slightly pink, about 6 minutes; stir frequently so the ground beef doesn’t clump.

2. Add the collard greens and tomatoes and sauté until the collard greens are wilted, about 4 minutes. Stir everything gently as it cooks, being careful not to mush the tomatoes. Add the lemon juice, season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve.