Skip to main content

See also:

Amedysis Agrees to $150 Million False Claims Settlement

Amedisys Inc. and its affiliates (Amedisys) have agreed to pay $150 million to the federal government to resolve allegations that they violated the False Claims Act by submitting false home healthcare billings to the Medicare program.

That’s according to a press release issued by the U.S. Department of Justice Friday.

Amedisys is a Louisiana-based for-profit company and one of the nation’s largest providers of home health services and operates in 37 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

The company also has offices in Toccoa, Lavonia, Hartwell, Clayton, Demorest, Blairsville, Athens, and Dahlonega, as well as the Upstate of South Carolina.

This settlement resolves seven lawsuits pending against Amedisys in federal court – six in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and one in the Northern District of Georgia – that were filed under the whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act.

As part of the settlement, the whistleblowers – primarily former Amedisys employees – will collectively split over $26 million.

“It is critical that scarce Medicare home health dollars flow only to those who provide qualified services,” said Stuart F. Delery, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division. “This settlement demonstrates the department’s commitment to ensuring that home health providers, like other providers, comply with the rules and don’t misuse taxpayer dollars.”

Delery said the settlement resolves allegations that, between 2008 and 2010, certain Amedisys offices improperly billed Medicare for ineligible patients and services.

Amedisys allegedly billed Medicare for nursing and therapy services that were medically unnecessary or provided to patients who were not homebound, and otherwise misrepresented patients’ conditions to increase its Medicare payments.

The billing violations were the alleged result of management pressure on nurses and therapists to provide care based on the financial benefits to Amedisys, rather than the needs of patients.

“Home health services are a large and growing part of our federal health care system,” said Sally Quillian Yates, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia. “Health care dollars must be reserved to pay for services needed by patients, not to enrich providers who are bilking the system.”

Additionally, the settlement resolves certain allegations that Amedisys maintained improper financial relationships with referring physicians in Georgia.

The Anti-Kickback Statute and the Stark Statute restrict the financial relationships that home healthcare providers may have with doctors who refer patients to them.

According to Delery, the Justice Department alleges Amedisys’ financial relationship with a private oncology practice in Georgia – whereby Amedisys employees provided patient care coordination services to the oncology practice at below-market prices – violated statutory requirements.

The United States’ investigation was conducted by the Justice Department’s Commercial Litigation Branch of the Civil Division; the United States Attorneys’ Offices for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, Northern District of Alabama, Northern District of Georgia, Eastern District of Kentucky, District of South Carolina, and Western District of New York; the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General; the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Office of Personnel Management’s Office of Inspector General; the Defense Criminal Investigative Service of the Department of Defense; and the Railroad Retirement Board’s Office of Inspector General.