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Always make things that tend to be expensive if you can

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I was looking over my recipe collection and I found another recipe for chutney, this time based on apples. Back in my mother's day you could find apples among the canned fruits, just unsweetened apples sliced and packed. I don't really see them nowadays, but that doesn't impede the chutney because you are going to simmer them long enough to cook them through.

The recipe below, which is otherwise unchanged, includes apple cider vinegar. I note that you don't want to use Bragg's organic vinegar, simply because it is meant to be consumed fresh, as in salad dressing. Cooking with Bragg's will kill the "mother" bacteria that is living inside it before you cook. Just use a good apple-cider vinegar for this recipe, going along with the apple theme.

Chutney is, as you have noticed, on the expensive side. It is usually found next to other condiments such as ketchup and mustard, since it isn't meant to be spread on bread. It can be hot or sweet, and the sweet chutneys are usually based on mangoes, which are plentiful in India where chutney was discovered by Europeans living there back in the colonial days.

I used to buy mango chutney until I found recipes that I could make myself, and then I changed over because making chutney is about as easy as making cocoa, if you don't mind the preparation time involved in slicing and chopping. Once you have it all done, you basically heat it up like cranberry sauce and there you go.

APPLE CHUTNEY

Ingredients:

2 cups apple slices (peeled, cored, chopped)
2 cups apple juice
1 cup golden brown sugar
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar (not Bragg's)
1 cup light raisins
1 medium onion, chopped
1 lemon, sliced and seeds removed
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon ground red chili peppers
1/4 cup bottled chili sauce

Place all ingredients in a saucepan. Bring it to a simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring often, for 30 minutes.

Turn off the heat after 30 minutes and allow the chutney to cool on top of the stove until it is no longer hazardous. Transfer it to bottles or plastic boxes and store refrigerated or frozen.

If you prefer a mild chutney, skip the crushed red peppers, or add just a pinch. The bottled chili sauce will not heat it up.

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