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Allegedly, allegedly, allegedly

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A reporter on ABC news reported on a news story about a Mother Protects Kids From Carjacker: During the reporting, the reporter stated allegedly or alleged five times;

  1. "Texas mother's determination to keep her family out of danger drove her to battle an alleged carjacker..."
  2. "Ismael Martinez allegedly..."
  3. "Martinez, 54, allegedly pulled..."
  4. When she refused, Martinez allegedly..."
  5. Martinez was airlifted to Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston with serious injuries after the alleged..."

Why did the reporter seemingly had to repeat allegedly four more times? A common practice in giving a speech is to tell the audience what will be discussed, tell the audience, and then tel them what was discussed. By telling an audience the points of a speech three times, the audience is more likely to remember. Was the reporter, by repeating alleged or allegedly four more times, attempting to instill in the minds of his audience that this allegedly carjacker is totally innocent or what?

Is there a legal requirement to state alleged carjacker, thief, burglar, murderer, kidnapper, etc.? If so, why wasn't the first statement, Texas mother's determination to keep her family out of danger drove her to battle an alleged carjacker..." sufficient for the story?

For those who listen carefully, filler words (audible pauses) such as "ah," "um," and "you know" become a distraction when repeater too many times. Was the use of alleged or allegedly a distraction?
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