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All you need is love, and Pomegranates

Personal photos on pomegranate wallpaper
Personal photos on pomegranate wallpaper
Courtesy of Skirball Cultural Center

Fallen Fruit at the Skirball is a installation art project that has been developed over the past few months by the art collaborative, Fallen Fruit, and the Skirball Cultural Center. Using photographic portraits, experimental documentary videos, public art installations, and curatorial projects, Fallen Fruit uses fruit as a common denominator to change the way you see the world.

The collaboration began when Fallen Fruit’s David Burns and Austin Young discovered an ornate Italian ketubbh ( Jewish marriage contract) dating back to 1677 which will be on view as part of the exhibition. The cultural ritual of marriage and the symbolic meanings of the pomegranate are the inspiration for the exhibit.

Over the course of the six-month residency, the public was invited to share photographs of themselves with someone they love. The photos have been hung on special pomegranate-patterned wallpaper in the Skirball’s Ruby Gallery These include wonderful photos of newlyweds embracing in their kitchen, couples celebrating anniversaries, grand parents sharing special moments with their grandchildren, a mother and daughter holding hands on the daughters wedding day. These images are inspiring and personal, people inviting you into their personal world to witness and celebrate their happiness and love.

Native to Persia, pomegranate trees were planted throughout Africa, Asia, and Europe over the course of many centuries of trade and world exploration. In cultures worldwide, the pomegranate appears as a symbol of fertility and good relationships. During some Persian wedding ceremonies, pomegranates are placed on a ceremonial cloth to symbolize a joyous future. In some Greek customs, the groom hands his bride a ripe pomegranate as she enters their new home. In Jewish tradition, the pomegranate is a symbol from biblical times relating to the garments of the priesthood and royalty. According to one rabbinic tradition, a pomegranate contains 613 seeds corresponding directly to divine commandments in the Torah.

Using social media Burns and Young have researched the emotional, cultural and intellectual ingredients that make for a great relationship, engaging the public in answering a series of questions like, “What is the best ingredient for true love?”

Over the course of the six-month residency, the public was invited to share photographs of themselves with someone they love. The photos have been hung on special pomegranate-patterned wallpaper in the Skirball’s Ruby Gallery These include wonderful photos of newlyweds embracing in their kitchen, couples celebrating anniversaries, grand parents sharing special moments with their grandchildren, a mother and daughter holding hands on the daughters wedding day. These images are inspiring and personal, people inviting you into their personal world to witness and celebrate their happiness.

Fallen Fruit will be on view at the Skirball’s Ruby Gallery through October 12, 2014. For more info visit: http://www.skirball.org/exhibitions/fallen-fruit