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Alcohol now blamed for 1 out of 10 deaths for people 20-64 years old

Many people may be unaware of how much they are actually consuming because of over-sized glasses.
Many people may be unaware of how much they are actually consuming because of over-sized glasses. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

A shocking new report from the CDC states that the deaths of 1 out of 10 people between the ages of 20-64 is directly tied to excessive drinking, both publicly and privately. This not only includes vehicular accidents, but drinking induced violence according to (the coincidentally named) Dr. Robert Brewer, head of the CDC’s alcohol program and one of the study’s lead authors.

Brewer defines binge drinking as consuming 5 or more alcoholic beverages at one occasion for men, and 4 or more drinks for women. Heavy drinking, on the other hand is when men have 15 or more drinks a week, and women have 8 or more per week. He also stated that “any alcohol consumed during pregnancy is considered excessive, and that goes for people younger than 21 as well.”

In addition, Dr. Jeffrey Reynolds, who serves as executive director if the Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence noted that many people may be unaware of how much they are actually consuming after finding out that many bars and restaurants have increased the size of serving glasses, as well as offering craft beers which tend to have higher alcohol content.

“The alcohol content for some wines has also been rising during the past few years to anywhere from 14-18%, while the popular ‘super-sized’ wineglasses actually hold 2.5 drinks. Another problem comes from the practice of many establishments offering specials such as two or three drinks for the price of one in order to attract more customers.”

Another major concern is the rise in overall addictions across the country, including a epidemic of heroin and cocaine use that is also being mixed with liquor.

Not only does alcohol have an effect on all the major organs in the body, the CDC stated that “over the long haul, drinking can lead to heart disease, high blood pressure, a number of liver cancer and other liver diseases, as well as breast cancer.”