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Actor and Writer Barry Floyd Discusses The Game

Barry Floyd
Barry Floyd
Barry Floyd

In the world of network television, it’s a blessing for a series to get seven seasons. A long lifespan by any measure of the entertainment business. But for actor and writer Barry Floyd, it’s all just part of The Game. Floyd and the rest of the cast from the successful BET show will return for a seventh season beginning March 4th.

Last season, fans of the show saw Floyd’s character “Tee Tee” Carter transition from being a sidekick to Malik Wright (Hosea Chanchez) to becoming more involved in his own Cluck Truck business. This season, fans will get to see Tee Tee in an even more dramatic light as things take a turn for the worse. As an actor, Floyd was originally only set to appear in a few episodes of the show, but his character was so well received that he was added on as a series regular.

In addition to acting, Floyd is also a lead-writer and director of the online sketch comedy series, “Purple-Stuff TV” along with having several other projects in various stages of development. I spoke with him about the new season of The Game as well as some of his other passions.

What can fans expect out of this new season of The Game?

Without giving too much away, I will say that my character gets into some trouble with his Cluck Truck business and takes a big financial hit. Fans are going to see Tee Tee at a really low point in his life as he tries to recover and get back to where he was. For me, it was a great opportunity to do some dramatic acting and be able to flex that muscle.

How would you describe your character?

Tee Tee is probably the most relatable character on the show. Everyone else has sort of a larger than life personality. They’re all either professional football players or agents or people associated with the world of pro athleticism. Tee Tee just happens to be a guy who’s along for the ride. Over the course of the show people have seen his transition; starting out as a sidekick to creating his own business and building it from the ground up. His path mirrors someone in real life. Someone who’s just starting out and builds something from nothing. I think Tee Tee is an inspiration for people like that.

What’s the chemistry like on the set?

After seven seasons it’s become a well-oiled machine. When Hosea, Wendy (Raquel Robinson) and I are together, its rapid fire. We just know each others tendencies and styles of acting.

How did the role of Tee Tee come about?

I was working as a production assistant on the show ‘Girlfriends’. One day, they were doing a rehearsal in front of network executives and one of the actors wasn’t there for some reason. So they asked me to just stand in and say his lines. I took it very seriously and when I did it, I got a lot of laughs. The casting director also happened to be there and asked me if I’d be interested in reading for the role of Tee Tee in ‘The Game’. I went in and read for it, not really knowing what to expect. But I ended up booking it and became an actor.

What are some of the other projects you’re currently working on?

In addition to working with Brandon Broussard on our sketch comedy show Purple Stuff TV, we’re also working on a new project that’s a male version of a show similar to ‘Sex in The City’ and ‘Girls’. One where it’s the men who can be brutally honest about dating and sex. I’m also working with Sebastian Burton on a pilot with a working title of ‘Show Up or Shut Up’. Sebastian was on the show ‘Ultimate Gamer’ and is big in pro gaming circles. He’s won a lot of tournaments and actually makes a living playing video games. The pilot is based on his life as a pro gamer.

Was becoming an actor something you always aspired to?

I went to college at Temple and got a film and media arts degree with an original goal of moving to LA to become a screenwriter and write movies. Acting was an opportunity that fell into my lap and I quickly discovered a passion for it I never knew that I had.

What did you enjoy most about the transition of Tee Tee over the course of The Game?

It kind of mirrors my acting career. I started out as a production assistant who had the opportunity to act on a show. The first few seasons I remember just being happy to be there, surrounded by these veteran actors and trying to soak up everything I could. But as time went on, I came into my own and instead of seeing myself as someone who was lucky to be there, I saw myself as someone who deserved to be there and earn a spot to grow as an actor. I still continue to grow every day.

The Game returns to BET on March 4th - Follow Barry Floyd on Twitter: @Barry_Floyd