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Activist and ex-con Coronado goes on Wolf Hunt Sabotage tour

He doesn’t just talk the talk. He plans to encourage and organize groups to go camping in areas that are populated by wolves.
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You may have heard of animal rights activist and ex-convict Rod Coronado by his famous accomplishments for animal rights such as taking the lead in sinking two Icelandic whaling ships through his organization the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. Coronado is a believer in using direct action to protect marine habitat and wildlife. And now he is traveling on his Northwest Wolf Hunt Sabotage speaking tour which began January 30 in Denver.

In the past Coronado has made a name for himself by such actions as sabotaging mountain lion traps and arson. This time, perhaps inspired by living in Michigan, he is taking on the task of spreading awareness about wolves.

“A lot of people know me because of my past activism so I’m trying to use that, take advantage of that, to get people involved in the wolf issue,” Coronado says.

Michigan became the sixth state to legalize wolf hunts, claiming that overpopulation and a danger to citizens are the primary reasons. Coronado is speaking out against these wolf killings on his tour.

“It's the first time in like nine years I've been able to be involved in activism,” Coronado says. Up until recently he had been otherwise engaged serving time and probation for burning seed cooperatives and setting animals free at two different Universities.

“It wouldn't take me much to end up in federal prison for the rest of my life,” Coronado says. “I’d rather see all the intelligent, effective activists dedicating themselves to more sustainable tactics.”

The tactic, he explains, is spreading awareness and empowering people to make a difference.

“I want them to feel like they have a voice and that there still are avenues for them to make a difference for animals in the wild,” Coronado says. “It’s really easy to click a button and send a letter to an agency, but we need to get out there in the field and see what’s being done to wildlife.”

He doesn't just talk the talk. He plans to encourage and organize groups to go camping in areas that are populated by wolves.

“We have to remember to have a sense of humor and have fun,” Coronado says.

(Amanda Carlucci has her finger on the pulse of the green movement. Stay up to date on the latest in green activism. You CAN make a difference. Be a part of the movement, and click here to subscribe. It's anonymous and free!)