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Aaron Burr, who was born in Newark, New Jersey, became a U.S. vice president

At Lincoln Park, the 75 foot flag pole of the Planting of Democracy statue is a  patriotic site.
Lucy Santos

Memorial Day is not only a day to salute our veterans and troops; it is also a time to remember historical figures from our community. Aaron Burr, who was born in Newark, New Jersey on February 6, 1756, became the third vice president of the United States during President Jefferson’s first term in office. Aaron Burr, who was named after his father Rev. Aaron Burr, was the son of a charismatic preacher from Newark, New Jersey who was a minister at First Presbyterian Church in Newark, a church that still stands today. Not only was Rev. Aaron Burr an influential minister, he was an educator who founded Princeton University, an Ivy League college.

Like his father, Burr would work with people, not as a minister but as a politician. Before engaging in a political career, he was a bright boy who graduated from Princeton University, formerly known as the College of New Jersey, at the age of 13. He obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1772 when he was just 16 years old.

Aaron Burr, who would become the future vice president of the United States, was a patriot who loved his country. He served as a Continental Army officer in the Revolutionary War. After his military career, he became a successful lawyer and politician who held various political posts: New York State Assemblyman, New York State Attorney General and U.S. senator.

Aaron Burr’s biggest role in politics came in 1800 when Thomas Jefferson became the third president of the United Sates and Burr became the third vice president of the United States. After Burr killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel, his vice presidency was plagued with controversy.

At Arts High School in Newark, New Jersey, there is a tablet dedicated to Rev. Aaron Burr and his son Col. Aaron Burr who became the third vice president of the United States. Not only is Aaron Burr remembered in Newark, New Jersey but in our nation for posterity.