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A Week of Profound Remembrance: Losing the Last of the 29 Navajo Code Talkers

An Insignia dedicated to a unique category of American military hero who weren't even allowed to tell others of the crucial role they played in America's victory in WW II.
An Insignia dedicated to a unique category of American military hero who weren't even allowed to tell others of the crucial role they played in America's victory in WW II.nativequotesandbrilliance.ning.com

A Week of Profound Remembrance:
Losing the Last of the 29 Navajo Code Talkers

Part I

By: Brad Kronen

From a historical perspective, the first week of June of 2014 is highly significant in many commemorative ways.

June 6th, 2014 marks the 70th anniversary of the Allied Forces’ Invasion of Nazi Occupied Normandy, better remembered as D-Day. The Normandy Landings were pivotal for the Allied Forces to win back the Republic of France, invade the German occupied countries of Western Europe, and contributed significantly to the Allied Forces eventually emerging victorious over Nazi Germany.

A major historic event regarding the Second World War occurred two days prior to the numerous ceremonies and commemorative events honoring the Allied Forces Invasion at Normandy.

On June 4th, 2014, the last of the Navajo Code Talkers passed away.

Just as the events of D-Day were pivotal for the Allied Forces’ eventual victory in their European/Atlantic Operations, the same can be said regarding the crucially important role the Navajo Code Talkers played for the Allied Forces in eventually defeating the Japanese during the Pacific military campaign of the Second World War.

They were 29 in all. They each spoke a language that was phonetically complex and with no written form. They each dutifully served their country by doing near perfect, error free work, all while in the midst of some of the bloodiest Naval battles fought in the Pacific Ocean.

And they each were forbidden to tell anyone what they did during the War after it had ended.

In a country where they weren’t considered citizens, weren’t allowed to vote, and were punished for speaking the very language used to strategically contribute in an Allied Victory, these 29 men bravely put their lives at risk and fought to defend its freedoms they were never granted.

It is both right and very necessary during this profound week of historic remembrance to not only shed illumination on the historic importance this handful of heroic men played for the continuation of our country’s freedoms, but to also analyze the Navajo Code Talkers from not just a purely historical perspective, but from an astrologically karmic angle, as well.

In Part II, Brad discusses the astrological significance of the Navajo Code Talkers by focusing on the life of the last of the 29 to leave this world, Chester Nez.