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A plague on both your houses

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While politics typically involves a political analysis, it can often help us to further understand the motivation by looking at the underlying psychology as well. Specifically, the issue of Benghazi has resurfaced.

At issue is an email that was discovered when a conservative group, using the Freedom of Information Act uncovered a previously undisclosed document(http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/01/politics/benghazi-controversy-questions/in...). This was an email containing talking points to Congress that allegedly suggest that the administration is covering up a failure to act.

Of course, in the world of politics, much of the goal is about getting into power. It is a.game of making the other side look bad so that voters will put your party'scandidates in office.

Consider the qualities that define a dysfunctional family (http://www.counseling.txstate.edu/resources/shoverview/bro/dysfunc.htm). Among the characteristics are extreme rigidity in family rules, high levels of tension and/or arguing, extended periods of silence blame and avoidance as primary coping mechanisms.

The family problem can take many different forms such as emotional abuse. Perhaps this is a stretch, but this is evident as people from both parties go on ookitocal talk shows and accuse the other party of reprehensible activities. Accusations continue in the media as many conservative media organizations as well (http://www.google.com/search?q=benghazi+cover+up&oq=benghazi+cover+up&gs...)

Making sense?

There is now a call for an investigation by the House Oversight Committee, controlled by the Republicans, to further investigate allegations of a cover-up by the Democratic administration. This would have the secondary goal of giving the Republicans an advantage in the uocoming mid-term elections. The Republican Speaker of the House has called for a special bipartisan committee. The Democrats are threatening to boycott it.

Other than looking to boycott the committee to investigate Benghazi, Democrats have.been otherwise silent in the issue other than denying there was a cover-up. They are also upset that the make-up of the committee is uneven with seven Republicans and only five Democrats (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2014/05/09/benghazi-committe...).

As Republicans continue to attack Democrats, and the latter does little to counter, this may be similar to another psychological phenomenon in the news these days: bullying.

Although bullying is typically seen as occurring among.school-age children, consider this definition of social bullying (http://www.stopbullying.gov/what-is-bullying/definition/index.htm).

"Social bullying, sometimes referred to as relational bullying, involves hurting someone’s reputation or relationships. Social bullying includes:

Leaving someone out on purpose
Telling other children not to be friends with someone
Spreading rumors about someone
Embarrassing someone in public"

Democrats seem to be exhibiting signs of bullied victims. They, as a party, seem to be displaying low self-esteem and anxiety (http://www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/bullying-victims.htm).

It seems as though this is what our political system has become. Rather than being a clearinghouse for ideas to govern better, it is one big dysfunctional family complete with name-calling and bullying.

While some dysfunctional families can be helped with counseling, unless they say what's going on and change, it may be up to the American people to decide going forward who they want to out into office.

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