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A Literary Tour of Boston

The Hidden Treasures of a Boston Literary Tour
The Hidden Treasures of a Boston Literary Tour
Camille Frame

A great way to plan an itinerary in Boston or any city for that matter is to base your itinerary on your favorite books set in that city.

Boston is the home of many literary landmarks as well as the setting of many books by well-known local authors. Pick your favorite title and discover Boston off the beaten path.

Your options are as numerous as there are books with Boston as the setting. Boston has an impressive literary resume with a long list of landmarks and classic authors.

Do a little research and find yourself walking a very interesting trail. The Omni Parker House is where Charles Dickens first read the Christmas Carol before the Saturday Club, whose extraordinary members also included Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, James Russell Lowell, and John Greenleaf Whittier to name a few.

Other famous local authors include Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Wendell Philips.

A literary tour in Boston can include stops such as the Omni Parker House, Old South Meeting House, Boston Public Library and the independent library known as the Boston Athenaeum. All offer incredible beauty for the senses as well as a long impressive list of historical facts.

The libraries each offer their own tours. The Boston Athenaeum in addition to its impressive book collections houses paintings and sculptures. The first municipal free library in the United States, the Boston Public Library has its own pleasing treasures including: Bates Hall, the Chavannes Gallery, The Abbey Room, the Sargent Gallery, and the courtyard.

Outside of the city heading towards Concord you can pass by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s Cambridge home and Mount Auburn Cemetery on the Watertown line as the final resting place of many of Boston’s famous literary figures. In Concord at the Concord Museum you can see Henry David Thoreau’s desk on exhibit and across the street is the setting for the house in Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women.

Experience for oneself the treasures of Boston as the intellectual and literary hub of the United States.