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A fond farewell to those who died in 2013

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In some respects, 2013, which winds to a close in 6 days, was unlike previous years. You can probably identify for yourself some of the events and news stories that defined it. But in one important respect, 2013 was like every year before it and years yet to come. That is in the names and achievements of the individuals to whom we had to say goodbye. The following is a list culled by the Associated Press. Feel free to add the names of any people we missed, including those who occupied a special place of importance in your own life.

JANUARY:

Patti Page, 85. Singer who stumbled across "Tennessee Waltz" and made it one of the best-selling recordings ever. Jan. 1.

Gerda Lerner, 92. Pioneer in the field of women's history and a founding member of the National Organization for Women. Jan. 2.

Ned Wertimer, 89. He played Ralph the Doorman on all 11 seasons of the CBS sitcom "The Jeffersons." Jan. 2.

Huell Howser, 67. Homespun host of public television's popular "California's Gold" travelogues. Jan. 6.

Evan S. Connell, 88. Author, whose literary explorations ranged from Depression-era Kansas City in the twin novels "Mrs. Bridge" and "Mr. Bridge" to Custer's last stand in "Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn." Jan. 10.

Aaron Swartz, 26. Co-founder of Reddit and activist who fought to make online content free to the public. Jan. 11. Suicide.

Khanh Nguyen, 86. South Vietnamese general who briefly gained control of the government in a coup and went on to lead a "government in exile" in California. Jan. 11.

Eugene Patterson, 89. Pulitzer Prize-winning editor who helped fellow Southern whites understand the civil rights movement, eloquently reminding the silent majority of its complicity in racist violence. Jan. 12.

Conrad Bain, 89. Veteran stage and film actor who became a star in middle age as the kindly white adoptive father of two young African-American brothers in the TV sitcom "Diff'rent Strokes." Jan. 14.

Nagisa Oshima, 80. Japanese film director acclaimed for "Empire of Passion" and "In the Realm of the Senses." Jan. 15.

Andre Cassagnes, 86. Inventor of Etch A Sketch, toy that generations of children drew on, shook up and started over. Jan. 16.

Pauline Friedman Phillips, 94. Under the name of Abigail Van Buren, she wrote the long-running "Dear Abby" newspaper advice column read by millions. Jan. 16.

James Hood, 70. One of the first black students who enrolled at the University of Alabama a half century ago in defiance of racial segregation. Jan. 17.

Earl Weaver, 82. Fiery Hall of Fame manager who won 1,480 games with baseball's Baltimore Orioles. Jan. 19.

Stan Musial, 92. St. Louis Cardinals star with the corkscrew stance and too many batting records to fit on his Hall of Fame plaque. Jan. 19.

Hans Massaquoi, 87. Former managing editor of Ebony magazine whose distinctive memoir described his unusual childhood growing up black in Nazi Germany. Jan. 19.

Donald F. Hornig, 92. Scientist who served as a key figure on the Manhattan Project, an adviser to three U.S. presidents and president of Brown University. Jan. 21.

Linda Pugach, 75. Blinded in 1959 when her lover hired hit men to throw lye in her face, she became a media sensation after later marrying him. Jan. 22.

Cardinal Jozef Glemp, 83. Longtime head of Poland's influential Roman Catholic church who helped lead the nation peacefully through martial law and the fight against communism. Jan. 23.

Leroy "Sugarfoot" Bonner, 69. Frontman for the hit-making funk music band the Ohio Players. Jan. 26.

Ceija Stojka, 79. She survived three Nazi death camps and went on to raise the awareness of the Nazi persecution of the Roma _ or Gypsies _ in her art and writings. Jan. 28.

Said Musa Maragha, 86. Hard-line Palestinian military commander better known by his nom de guerre, "Abu Musa," who rebelled against leader Yasser Arafat to form his own rival party. Jan. 29.

Patty Andrews, 94. Last of the singing Andrews Sisters trio whose hits such as the rollicking "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B" and the poignant "I Can Dream, Can't I?" captured the home-front spirit of World War II. Jan. 30.

Read the rest of the story here.

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