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98 year old evicted: Woman evicted from home she resided in for 50 years

98 year old woman evicted from her home of 50 years in San Francisco.
98 year old woman evicted from her home of 50 years in San Francisco.Commons Wikimedia

A 98 year old woman has been evicted from her home in San Francisco after living there for 50 years. Mary Phillips isn't about to take the eviction from building owners lying down. She says in an interview that she'll have to be removed "feet first" before she willingly leaves.

According to Huffington Post July 10, the elderly woman was served an eviction notice that came from Urban Green Investments. The organization wants to remove tenants so they can work on further developments in San Fancisco's "booming" real estate market. They purchased the building in 2012 for $2.5 million, making the previous owners $1.2 million profit, Think Progress reports.

The landowners are allowed to evict tenants because of the Ellis Act, which allows property owners to quit renting to tenants so they can sell it for a profit. It's a black-and-white type of setup that has no gray area for tenants.

The 98 year old evicted from her home of 50 years says she's never paid her rent late. She's stunned about the notice she received that she now must move out.

Phillips isn't alone in her mindset whatsoever. A number of protesters are letting people know how many tenants are being treated as San Francisco becomes one of the most expensive places in the U.S. to live.

A Facebook page dedicated to supporting Mary Phillips and other renters in her situation has been created.

Vanishingsf Facebook reads:

"Feel free to let Urban Green CEO David McCloskey, who's evicting her, know what you think, ask him how he sleeps at night and if he'd put his grandmother on the streets."

Contact information on the Facebook page is: David@urbangreeninv.com with the phone number (415) 651-4441.

It's not clear if those advocating for tenants and the 98 year old woman evicted will truly make a difference. Urban Green hasn't responded to the protests, but it might pressure them to reassess their methods in how they kick out renters.