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7 cool treats in historic St. Louis: Part 6

The “New Century in Old Orchard” walking tour includes Webster University’s Thompson House, a Tudor Revival home built in 1910. Eleanor Roosevelt stayed here in 1949 on a visit to St. Louis to look over plans for the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial.
The “New Century in Old Orchard” walking tour includes Webster University’s Thompson House, a Tudor Revival home built in 1910. Eleanor Roosevelt stayed here in 1949 on a visit to St. Louis to look over plans for the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial.
Photo by Amy Borrelli

Cool treat #6: Come for the cake batter ice cream, stay for the architecture.

Winner of many a “best ice cream in St. Louis” contest, Serendipity, 8130 Big Bend Blvd. in Webster Groves, features a revolving door of flavors, with 28 available on any given day. Customers who can’t decide between Cookie Monster, salted caramel swirl, Gold Coast chocolate, cake batter, Bordeaux cherry or pumpkin pie can narrow it down a bit by ordering a Tiny Trio of three small scoops.

Order it to-go and saunter over to Gazebo Park, the starting point for a 2.4-mile walking tour mapped out by the Webster Groves Historical Society. This part of town was once blanketed with apple and peach trees, hence the name, Old Orchard.

The tour encompasses nearly 50 sites of historical and architectural significance, including a 1908 Craftsman home built by the inventor of Tums and a Queen Anne-style house owned by a couple who sold Old Orchard Mineral Spring Water at the 1904 World’s Fair.

Brochures for the tour (along with five other routes) are available for free at the Webster Grove library or outside City Hall.