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5 Ways To Trick Your Mind Into Doing What The Body Doesn't

The body and brain battling one another
The body and brain battling one another
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jdhancock/

Are you a good starter but terrible finisher? Do you have good ideas but find the work to achieve them exhausting? I felt like that writing my book about online classes.

I know, I also thought the same finishing college - a life long dream that eluded me for a decade.

I finished college, but not after learning several surefire ways to trick my mind into doing what my body didn't want.

Visualizing the result
Finishing college required visualizing myself walking down the aisle at graduation, filled with cheering people and classmates.

I envisioned my name called over the intercom. Silly, I know but visualizing the end result pushed me through tough times popping up virtually every day.

Start and finish small
With a concrete vision, I bit off only what I could chew. I didn't try to complete more than one course at a time and as a result, I didn't overwhelm myself. I felt comfortable and motivated to complete the course at hand for an extended period of time.

I maintained a consistent pace in the beginning and at the end.

Reward yourself often
I like rewards. I'm sure you do too. I make every effort to enjoy the fruits of my labor each paycheck by buying myself something. I developed this while in college.

After each completed class, I treated myself to a beer and special dinner, acknowledging my hard work and commitment.

This was an excellent motivator at the start of each course as envisioned myself relaxing at a dinner table, scarfing down good food.

Take it one day at a time
College and life is a marathon not a sprint, so view don't overload each day with a mountain to do's. Write out a few things to accomplish each day, complete them and cross them out.

Do it all over the next day, and the day after that.

Stay focused on the day at hand. Avoid looking at the totality of life, a project or a class day one, instead chip away at the larger goal slowly but surely.

Build muscle memory
Do something long enough and you'll develop the ability to perform it without thinking. This is the essence of muscle memory.

The mind controls the body, thus focus on building processes in your mind. Once developed and practiced, the body will naturally do what the mind tells it to do - without thinking about it.

Similar to putting on pants each morning, where years of repetition lead to second nature, so should our actions toward goals we establish.