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30 second smartphone charger on the horizon

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Sick of your smartphone dying in the middle of the day? Even sicker of waiting an hour or longer for it to charge? Israeli startup StoreDot is banking on it, and its reveal of its groundbreaking smartphone battery charger at the Think Next symposium in Tel Aviv this week has caused a major ripple in the tech community. Watch the demo video here.

The startup's founder, Dr. Doron Myersdorf, has announced that the company has raised US $6.25 million so far towards its bio-organic fast-charging battery project. The speed demon charger, currently about one year away from being a “functional prototype” that is small enough to fit inside a smartphone, will allow you to charge your phone's dead battery completely in about 30 seconds.

If StoreDot has its way, you might be able to buy this speedy charging battery technology within three years: one year to shrink the prototype to fit the phone's body, and another two years to attain the efficiency and energy density needed to make the charger work. Commercial production is scheduled for the end of 2016. Typical smartphone chargers cost as much as US $30 now, but the StoreDot version will likely cost twice as much.

The technology that drives's StoreDot's charger arises originates in Alzheimer’s disease research in the Tel Aviv University nanotechnology department. The research identified the peptides that can lead to the development of nano-crystals or quantum dots. These nano-crystals are stable and robust, making them ideal for use in StoreDot's bio-organic battery. These conductive “battery” crystals can greatly improve charging speed and reduce toxicity in the environment; unlike substances like cadmium, the nano-crystals are non-toxic.

StoreDot plans to extend this technology for use in other smartphones and devices. Aside from the fast-charging smartphone battery application, the nano-crystals can be used in the creation of cadmium-free displays. This means that StoreDot will likely be the producer of the first viable bio-organic display, assuming they can achieve similar lifetime and efficiency to the cadmium display as projected.

As StoreDot begins the next stage of fundraising for its nano-crystal technology venture in the wake of its wildly successful demo, the company naturally has nothing negative to say about its process. Myersdorf presents the nano-crystal approach and its nanotechnology as a whole as presenting “only advantages.” Of course, various scientists and other professionals have called for a more tempered and cautious approach to nanotechnology generally in the interest of mitigating against health and environmental risk. However, thus far, no direct risks to the charge or its technology are apparent.

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