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1800’s sightings lend validity to reality of UFOs

Reports of UFOs in the late 1800's include one in which the craft was referred to as a flying saucer. This is a very old photo of what is claimed to be a crashed UFO during the 1800's.
Reports of UFOs in the late 1800's include one in which the craft was referred to as a flying saucer. This is a very old photo of what is claimed to be a crashed UFO during the 1800's.
Public use photo

The three UFO reports cited below and many others like them that have occurred throughout history all came before man even learned how to fly fast-moving crafts. There is no way that any of them could be deemed man made, which gives further validity to the fact that UFOs have always been and still are flying in the skies above the earth.

Sightings of UFOs are certainly nothing new to the 21st century, although today there are many more reported people now have access to cameras and the ability to report their sightings on line. But back on January 25, 1878, the Denison Daily News contained an article entitled A Strange Phenomenon about a local farmer who claimed to have seen a “flying saucer.”

John Martin was perhaps the first person to use the term for what he saw on January 2. The term was later believed to be first said by pilot Kenneth Arnold in 1947. Martin initially described the object as a dark colored “balloon-shaped” airship. The article states: “Tuesday morning while out hunting, his attention was directed to a dark object high up in the southern sky. The peculiar shape and velocity with which the object seemed to approach riveted his attention and he strained his eves to discover its character.”

The article goes on to state that Martin described it as “about the size of an orange, which continued to grow in size.”
The man continued to stare at the object until he turned away to rest his eyes. When he looked back, “the object was almost overhead and had increased considerably in size, and appeared to be going through space at wonderful speed.”

Doubters could say Martin actually saw a hot air balloon, since one was first flown in 1873 in Paris, France. However, the speed of the object along with his description of it being a flying saucer seem to discount this possibility.

In fact, there were three UFOs reported in Texas in the 1800’s and early 1900’s. In April 1897, what became known as The Aurora Crash occurred. In this case, the UFO crashed into a windmill and a “small being’ was found. Pieces of the craft had writing like hieroglyphics on it. With no major military force to swoop in to overtake the scene, the residents held a descent burial for the alien being.

Also in 19887, the Houston Post reported a sighting in Josserand in which a local farmer heard a “whirring sound.” When he went outside to investigate, he was surprised to see “a large, unknown object land in his cornfield.” Frank Nichols described the object as a “flying vessel” decorated with “brilliant colored lights.”

According to the newspaper report, “two beings” emerged from the object “holding buckets.” It seems they needed water and asked Nichols if they could have some. During the course of doing so, Nichols saw six to eight “crewmen” who asked him if he would like to come on board.

Nichols told the newspaper reporters that the inside of the craft was more advanced than anything he had ever seen.

Source: 10 Best Texas UFO Sightings